A Scripter's Notes

Emacs, scripting and anything text oriented.

Posts in “Emacs”

A Better Less?

I use emacs – with a server1 and client setup – so that I can quickly open new files in it using emacsclient. My typical setup is to have xterm + tmux on one monitor and a single emacs(client) frame on another. But there are times when I do not want to shift focus from one monitor to another, like when I just need to review some log file. So I started using an alias to emacs -nw -Q to quickly open log files, review, filter, and C-x C-c.

Of course, that’s not where this post ends. An alias was no longer adequate to do what I wanted it to do more ..

Emacsclient on Windows

Using emacsclient instead of the emacs binary is a very useful technique to prevent loading emacs from scratch each time you open a new file. That technique is useful on Windows too. But for this to work on Windows, we need some more elisp and Windows environment variable configuration than just the below code,

(require 'server)
;; Start a server if (server-running-p) does not return t (e.g. if it
;; returns nil or :other)
(or (eq (server-running-p) t)
    (server-start))

Do ediff as I mean

In almost all of my ediff use cases, I would have windows open side-by-side in a frame, and then I would want to do a diff between the two using ediff-buffers.

But emacs doesn’t know that. So it always asks me to select the buffers I want to diff. The same problem is with ediff-files too.

So I came up with the below helper function to pick the correct ediff command ..

Save a macro as a function in emacs

I am in the process of converting traditional verilog test benches to SystemVerilog UVM test benches. As per the UVM methodology, it is recommended to use `uvm_info instead of $display statements so that the info statement encodes a Message ID and Message Verbosity along with the message required to be printed.

I won’t go in more detail about UVM and verilog as this post is about how I can save a macro that I use very frequently into an elisp function.

Inline LaTeX code fragments in Org

At times you might need your org exported pdf to have the exact font rendering as generated by a snippet of LaTeX code. To do that, wrap that code inbetween the \( and \) delimiters.

ctags, systemverilog and emacs

Update (2017/02/23) — Now I use GNU Global with Universal Ctags as back-end to generate the tag files. In emacs, I use the ggtags package – [config].

This post still has value if you are interesting in configuring ctags only.


This posts shows how to set up ctags to parse SystemVerilog code and how to access that tag database in emacs.


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